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are reaction to a little-known amateur movie produced in the united states which ridiculed the prophet mohammed. it gained attention because an obscure florida pastor began promoting it, the same man who triggered deadly riots in afghanistan when he threatened to burn the koran. we want to go straight to cairo where we find nbc chief foreign correspondent, richard engel. richard, fill us in a little more this morning. >> reporter: good morning. a libyan source has told nbc news that the u.s. ambassador who was visiting the consulate was killed along with three others. not sure of the nationality of those three others. the u.s. state department has not confirmed this, but this has been told to us by a senior security source in libya. we've been also told that the libyan prime minister and the libyan president will both be speaking today about this subject, offering their condolences to the united states and to the family of the fallen ambassador. and this is according to the report. we were told that when gunmen and a mob stormed the consulate building, they first attacked it with rpgs, then the
last october at the values voter summit. it has been crisscrossing the united states registering voters of sporting concerted candidates are running for office, and shining the light on this administration and its failed policies. please take a few minutes to step on board between new and to, today and tomorrow. it's parked recognize the exhibit hall. just follow the signs. you can't miss it. speaking of the exhibit hall we are delighted to have many profamily conservative organizations from all over the country or exhibiting with us. in fact, the second year in a row with so many we had to overflow in the air on the other side of the exhibit hall and was called birdcage walk. we plan to visit these wonderful exhibitors and to show them your appreciation for all the work they do. we are pleased to have our good friend of the media research center again as or sponsor of new media wrote located in the ballroom and, of course, you'll be hearing from a president roosevelt later in the program. almost finished. hang in there. i'm trying to make these announcements as dynamic as possible. [la
. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, september 21, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable richard blumenthal, a senator from the state of connecticut, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader smed. mr. reid: i had move to proceed to calendar number 504. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: motion to proceed to calendar number 504, s. 3525, a bill to protect and enhance opportunities for recreational hunting, fish, and shooting and for other purposes. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: the next hour will be equally divided between the two leader leaders who are their designees.
they hear that the president of the united states is no longer necessarily categorically calling egypt an ally? >> reporter: well, you know, quite honestly there's been a lot of confusion about what the u.s. role is right now and how the u.s. feels about egypt. before our revolution began, there was and continued to be a lot of anti-u.s. sentiment because of this support by various u.s. administrations for dictators in this region. but hearing the statement today, i think people are thinking, all right, well, whose side are you on because we're trying to get this revolution working and it has definitely confused a lot of people. >> all right, thank you so much for your time. i want to go directly to golden, colorado, where the president is speaking about the four who were killed in libya. >> serve in difficult and dangerous places all around the world, to advance the interests and the values that we hold dear as americans. and a lot of times their work goes unheralded, it doesn't get a lot of attention. but it is vitally important. we enjoy our security and our liberty because of the s
to where they were, we were in belt largest expansion in the history of the united states. fix medicare. allow negotiations for prescription drugs. that will save $240 billion over 10 years, and finally, takeaway subsidies from the big oil companies. they are very profitable, but they do not need our help. what you end up with then is not a $1 trillion problem. you end up with a problem in the $200 billion range. raising the ceiling, a default for the nation. he spoke out against the fairfax chamber and other chambers, and now he is saying, "wait a minute. we cannot make cuts." when he is running as the guy who wants to make cuts. he has more sides then a rubik cube. >> what your so-called plan would do to jobs. i think you should be taking into account what the impact is on jobs, and our economy, which is a major, major concern. you talked about bob mcdonnell and eric cantor. what they did was pass a measure that would avert these devastating cuts to our national defense and jobs in virginia. what has this than that done? absolutely nothing. they have not passed a budget in 3.5 years.
the united states. he has served as president as the atlantic monthly magazine, executive vice president of u.s. news and world report, and the co-editor of roll-call. we are delighted that he is here to comment on the subject. >> i want to begin by congratulating the doug and bill. this is an excellent study and i have to say i have read about three dozens of these and i even wrote one of them, which some people consider the best. this is an excellent report, for reasons i will go into. it urges america to show how to organize the government to do that. the current administration, not just the war of ideas as an activity, but the very phrase is now anathema, a sad development. this became evident to me when i started meeting with members of the foreign-policy team and was warned it would be unwise if i wanted to have any impact on their thinking to use the term "war of ideas." i am not sure which of the two is more offensive. my own authorization was clear. in the long run, winning the war on terror means winning the battle of ideas. it could not be clearer than that. around the same time, p
to the united states from the other states of the european union over for lunch. okay? germans in the chair, ambassadors from america, from the e.u. states over for lunch. he would then have an american coming in and be the lunchtime entertainment. the american-led come and give the lunchtime talk. i'm not sure who else was there. i would expect the secretary of state was invited, secretary defense. and the central intelligence agency. so i get invited and say okay, i've got a representative from every country in the european union. what makes an interesting speech? i've got it. let's talk about reconditions, interrogations'. so i did. [laughter] and i began the conversation -- i had a great staff at the cia. you are blessed as a people with the talent and morality of the folks in your service and i had a wonderful stuff and great speeches. was rear i would let anybody go with almost irresistible temptation to fool around with someone else's and i would make changes, but this was so important. an awful lot of it i wrote, and i remember page two or page three of the speech, you know, about m
is flying at half staff. ladies and gentlemen, the national anthem of the united states. [playing "the star-spangled benneranner"] >> ladies and gentleman, the united states army chief of chaplain, major general. >> let us pray. remember the events of september 11, 2001. pray for all of those who greek today. for those who witnessed and survived the attack -- pray for all of those who grieve today. for those who witnessed and survived the attack, on a day when the worst visited our nation, our spirits were inspired what we saw at grand 0 and at the pentagon. we pray for the men and women who have been called to defend our country both at home and abroad. inspired by their legacy, we ask for continued courage and strength in spirit to faithfully serve our military and our nation. we are thankful that in our time of loss, you have not abandoned us to our grief. help us so that we may do your work, peace and justice, offering forgiveness and building community. hear us, lord god, in your holy name we pray. amen. >> a mamen. >> 11 years ago, the pentagon was attacked. please join us in obs
] in the united states senate. still fighting for those who count on him to be their voice. using his intellect and his he will consequence he has fought to improve our health care choices and to protect our environment. and he called attention to the threat of terrorism before september 11. [applause] you know, i married the smartest, toughest, sweetest man i know. and in two days we will celebrate 27 years of marriage. [cheers and applause] the way we always do. we'll do it the way we always do, at wendy's. [laughter] whether it's wendy's or washington, i found that it's true. it's not where you go, it's who you go with. [cheers and applause] but none of the things i've mentioned are the reasons i married john edwards. i married him because he was the single most optimistic person that i have ever known. he knew there was a brighter day ahead even as he swept the floors in the cotton mill as a high school student. he knew if he worked hard enough, he could be the first in his family to go to college. he knew that he could outwork and outtough any battalion of lawyers to find justice. and he c
that the united states has to survive. it has to survive to show the world that the representative governments can work. the kids in 1848 in a series of revolutions in europe as they see it a failed as the democratic revolution, and so they see the united states this is it, the world's last shot. it has to work your order will never be tried again. so the states think they can destroy the government which is how the unions see it because they don't like to get elected. they said self-government doesn't work, so we have to prove that the thing can survive and that's how they start. but you don't have to be in a very long before they begin to think why do they get into this to begin with? talk to this virus and slaves -- southerners and slaves and they got into the problem to begin with because the institution of slavery. if you want to solve a problem, the only way to do it is to root out the cause. so union soldiers made a shift much earlier than i had anticipated. the big shift begins in the summer of 1861 with soldiers beginning to write home to their families and elected officials to say that i
be described as young a. >> thank you so much. there is no organization in the united states that is better at serving as a forum for the principal legal issues of the day fo. i have been asked to comment as well on the voting rights. kerrey has done such a good job. there is very little to add. then i will talk about the business cases. the two. i would make about the act is first to think about why it is the justices would get involved. these cases are not in the docket. in the illustration in to help the court work. the justices have a rule that says if we're point to strike down a federal statute, that is our job. they're likely to step in. the voting rights act case, several of them come on a peel. you have to ask the supreme court to grant review. there are slivers of cases in the united states coal that there is a right to go to the supreme court. they have different ways of dodging them. we almost have to take. they suggested very serious concerns about the constitutionality of section 5. the second point out and make is what to expect from the pivotal justices. this is at the cente
trying to find solutions to the problems of the united states of america. if he loves the united states of america, he should be out on his hinny getting this stuff done instead of talking all over this television and running romney down. host: thanks for the call from dayton, tennessee. want to give you one more story on the day, this from "the washington post," for politicians privacy vanishes in the age of video technology. mitt romney's mistake in speaking bluntly at a may fundraiser was not only in the words he spoke but failing to anticipate the ears they might breach, and audience that looked like an exclusive group of republican donors this week multiflied thanks to the pervasiveness of video technology. they are already confiscating smart phones but they have been largely overmatched as time and again moments intended to be kept secret have turned up on the internet. there is a total collapse of the notion of private space that the republican strategist, and top advisor of senator john mccain's presidential campaign in 2008, increasingly, politicians who say one thing behind cl
generation face nothing comparable to that of lawmakers in the mid-19th mid-19th century as the united states was on the bring of breaking apart, and the book that we're about to hear about, america's great debate,tles the story of the compromise of 1850, which helped to resolve at least for a while, the conflict over how to bring the vast mexican territory into the united states. the reviewer who did this review for the washington post happened to be don graham, the chairman of the washington post company, who is a student of history. he called this book original in concept and stylish in execution. the compromise that mr. bordewich will tell us about resulted from some of the most creative legislating that the country has ever seen, although mr. bordewich will be quick to point out that the compromise was also deeply flawed. but it did prevent an earlier breakup of the union. this is also a story that includes a magnificent cast of characters. befitting the epic struggles that played out during the course of the great debate. this is the third work be fergus bordewich which explores how sla
of the united states. >> find any speech from both the democratic and republican conventions online at the c-span video library. >> during the republican and democratic conventions, we're asking middle and high school students to send a message to the president, as part of this year's c-span student cam video documentary competition. in a short video, students will answer the question, what's the most important issue the president should consider in 2013? for a chance to win the grand prize of $5,000, and there's $50,000 in total prizes available. c-span's student cam video competition is open to students grade 6-12. for complete details and rules, go online to student cam.org. >> i want c-span, c-span2 and the books portion of c-span, because i feel it's important to be knowledgeable about what's going on in the world, and i feel that c-span gives the most information about what's going on in specific subjects, where a lot of television doesn't do that. >> hillary pate watches c-span on comcast. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your
to millions suffering from hiv aids. second is to foster a substantial united states strategic interests. perhaps military or diplomatic or economic. third is another purpose and one that i think has to receive much more attention and higher priority. in a romney administration and that is aid that elevates people and brings about lasting change in communities and nations. here is an example. a lot of americans including myself are troubled by developments in the middle east. syria has witnessed the killing of tens of thousands of people. the presidents of egypt is a member of the muslim brotherhood. our ambassador to libya was assassinated in a terrorist attack. iran is moving toward nuclear weapons capability. we somehow feel we are at the mercy of events rather than shaping events. i am often asked why. what can we do about it? to ease the suffering and enter and the hate and violence? religious extremism is part of a problem but that is not the whole story. the population of the middle east is very young particularly in comparison to the population of the developed nations. typically
things that is not a premarket industry in the united states because regardless of whether we have the information as to the optimus and effectiveness of a hospital or a physician problem -- or a physician, our health care provider networks that we are allowed to use are dictated by the insurance companies. a lot of the discussion about health care in the united states, people fail to discuss the role of the insurance companies and in network and out of network providers. i would like for you to comment on a world of our employers and large insurance companies play in directing where we get care. oftentimes, we are not allowed to get hair -- get care at, say, a university hospital or a teaching hospital regardless of our condition since solely because the out of pocket expenses will be way too high for a person to report getting the best care, even though it exists. guest: in my book and "and accountable," i share the reasons why it patient often decides to come to, particular hospital. their mother was treated there, the party was easy. if people are choosing a hospital based on t
will look at its importance in the region and its relationship with the united states. "this is america" visits the republic of kazakhstan. "this is america" is made possible by -- the national education association, the nation's largest advocate for children and public education. poongsan corporation, forging a higher global standard. the ctc foundation, afo communications, and the rotondaro family trust. this year, kazakhstan celebrates its 20th anniversary of independence. on this program, we will learn about what it was like before independence 20 years ago, and how oil and a visionary president made kazakhstan the success it is today and why diversifying its economy will be the key to kazakhstan's even brighter future. >> it was a while the economy, while business economy, and a great economy mainly. today, we have a lot of public companies. our businessmen are doing international joint ventures. if you take the society as a whole, are people became much more open-minded, a free, outspoken people, and we are much different from what we were before. >> has that been exciting to be a
was that, as the group here in the united states -- the united way is allowed to deduct from paychecks, yes? in order to have their funding, we wanted to have the same kind of thing possible for this international overseas giving program, which encompassed about 10 very worthy groups. we were actually beaten down on that by the united way who did not want anyone else to have such president, such a privilege, even though the funds -- such a precedent, such a privilege, even though the funds would not be competitive. it would not be going to anybody else in the country but overseas. isen's health care considered in many places a luxury and certainly far down on the list of the imperatives for that nation's funding. >> what should we take away from the virginia state legislators attend to require ultrasound for any women seeking abortions. [laughter] >> you know, it is a good thing my daughter is here. i woke up this morning -- somebody had brought this up yesterday and i was so bloody angry i said, you know what i am tempted to say and she said, don't say that, mom. so i will follow my daught
in the united states. we at the bush center -- are here with the their spouses we're fortunate to be associated with smu. our relationship with smu competed our expectations. i hope we have exceeded your expectations. we're very much involved in action oriented programs. i didn't want to be known as a think tanker. i want to be known as an a,-oriented place that can make a difference in the world. and so i want to thank you very much for having faith in us when we first convince you to support the bush center on the smu campus. we just got back from africa which is. we went over there because at the bush center, one of the major initiatives is to honor human life. we believe all life is precious. whether they live in america on the continent of africa. we are disturbed by the fact that many women who have got the hiv virus, are getting cervical cancer not much is being done with it with your help we put together a collaborative effort to save lives. part of the mission was to kick off the red ribbon in bots wanna as well as to follow up in zambia where we kick it off in december. we wanted to g
you are president of the united states, you are president of all the people. not just the people who voted for you. >> you've got to look at what the guy has talked about through the whole campaign. he believes that every american has to have skin in the game. has to have a stake. and he doesn't want what the president wants works i is a bigger, more bloated government that's taking more people's money and being more oppressive on people's lives. he wants to empower individuals through sacrifice and opportunity to get their lives as date as they can and be make america greater. >> the real story behind these comments is what is behind it is president obama's very deliberate attempt to do class warfare as part of his campaign strategy. it's president obama who has decided to divide the electorate down those levels. >> i get the general feeling that with more and more people becoming dependent on government, that by next july we could perhaps be so -- it will be dependence day, not independence day. this is not something i am just feeling alone. >> oh, come on. oh, come on. >> this cou
first. so of not red or blue states, what the united states. i no they're not that many football fans here today. my first story about president obama has to do with football. he was the last interview that i did for my book. i interviewed three andrew and 50 people will for him and traveled the world. i thought about what i would -- how i would break the ice with him for a long time. i remembered that he is a bears fan than i am a pakistan and that two years ago when the packers played the bears in the nfc championship game president obama announced that if the bears won he was going to the super bowl. the packers won. and the star player on the packers after the game got up on the table of the jesse berman said, president obama will come see us, but we're right to go see him at his house meeting if you win the super bowl you to visit the white house. this was their star quarterback, so when i finally got my interview with president obama and shook his hand and said, mr. president, charles got here before me, but i'm glad we both finally made it. he said, yeah, man, those packers wer
this country faces the starkest choice for president of the united states that has in that least my lifetime. that means in all of your lifetime. but for all the talk governor romney and congressman ryan have engaged in, they do not have the courage yet to tell you what their policies for this nation really are. it will shock you, i have the courage to tell you this morning with their policies are. [laughter] it's amazing if you listen to them. they talk so much about how they care about medicare. you would think it was a republican idea the way they talk about it. you think it was republicans supporting it. they talk about how they want to preserve it. they do it sincerely and talk about how they sincerely want to preserve and protect the benefits for all those people, guaranteeing all those people on medicare now, the 30 million seniors that nothing will change. if you listen to them these days, you would think that had been a republican plan all along. that's what they say and that is what they exude believe, and these are facts. they don't tell you that there fan with a meat -- their pla
. they are people like corporal dare onterrell hicks, united states army, from hawley, north carolina, who died july 19 of 2012, just two months ago. darian was a 2009 graduate where he was a standout students, loved and respected by all. darian always wanted to be a soldier. it was a goal he set early on and something that everyone remembers about him. it was a goal he pursued with diligence and honor. he was a model junior rotc student who was voted mr. junior r.t.c. by his peers. -- rotc by his peers. darian is remembered as the kind of young man a teacher wishes all their students were like. he was a boy you wanted your children to be friends with. he became the kind of man we should all be thankful to have in this world. when i was speaking with his mom, address, she said -- tracy, she shared with me he never gave her a problem, ever. corporate hicks enlisted in the army after graduating from high school. he loved the army and it seemed he had found his place in life. he loved his family and he kept in close contact with his mother. whenever he spoke with his mom, she would always tell him, alw
or iran or turkey invoking the greatness of their own power and impact and the united states tends to be more future oriented but in this particular case you found that the trauma of the hostage crisis and in the iranian revolution is still very formative and the - of americans who are responsible for the iran policy. >> guest: it is. ambassador ryan crocker told me one time in an interview that they are the most historical were the least historical society. and in this case i think there's still certainly every time they have a negotiation including the most recent one in moscow during the whole litany of grievances, so it is always on their mind. whether the u.s. policy makers realize it or not, the are too. the first years after the revolution clearly the hostage issue was for most american policy makers mind. if the iran contra happens that causes the relationship with the next prior risk and we saw it happen to ronald reagan and over a series of instances where they have spurred u.s. efforts to the rapprochement. there's a great example like to give just on this idea of the mo
states withdrawing, being weak, the united states not reacting with strength, with the way it should, and i think that's a recipe for disaster in the future. host: dan balls in the "washington post" saying it's time for romney to spell out his agenda. what does he need to do? guest: i think he could be more specific about what he wants to do. he said last week he had an economic plan, that would not decrease taxes on the wealthy, would not increase taxes on anyone, he could be more specific about that, i think. but i think the real case that he has to make is what happens if we have four more years, can we stand four more years of this. i think, my view is the country is being wrecked, that we are going downhill. maybe the most important statistic is not the economic stuff, which you hear endlessly about, unemployment and middle class family income and so on, but national morale, 57 percent of americans think we're in decline as a country and as a civilization. that's pathetic. this is what's happened to morale, our sense of selves if they want more they can elect barack obama. host:
's why i'm running for a second term as president of the united states. now, hold on a second. i want you to know, though, because some of you may not have been paying attention at the convention because you were still thinking about michelle and how good she was. [ cheers ] or maybe you're still talking about president clinton and how he broke it down. well, i want everybody to be clear. the path i'm offering isn't quick or easy. it's going to take more than a few years. to deal with all the challenges that we face. but let me tell you something, when i hear the other se talking about how the nation's in decline, i tell them, you must not be getting out much because this is america. and we've still got the best workers in the world and the best entrepreneurs in the world and the best scientists and researchers in the world, and the best colleges and universities in the world. and there's not a country on earth that wouldn't trade places with us right now. so i'm confident our problems can be solved. our challenges will be met. the path i offer is harder, but it leads to a better place. b
graduates in the united states right now who are basically indentured servants because they have these brutal unforgiving loans and they don't have jobs to be able to pay them back because wages are declining, we have high entrenched unemployment, and the jobs that are coming back are low wage, insecure, poor benefit jobs. so if you took student loans -- students, who are very good at communicating on the internet, if they decided they were going to create a peaceful revolution in the ballot box, they could do so because our campaign is the one solution that's will to, number one, forgive student debt, instead of bailing out the banks again for another trillion dollars, which is what the latest quantitative easing is going to do, we could -- we could be bailing out the students with the quantitative easing, buying up the bad debt in the student securities, the student loan securities, and essentially wiping out student debt because public higher education is a public good, we provided public education through high school degree, throughout the 20th century, but in the 21st centur
to be realistic about how we can tackle these challenges. if there is a crisis that i see in the united states for the long term, it is not the temporal issue of how we will deal with money. because i am very confident we will be able to deal with that. it is how will we bring that -- bring back our sense of what we can accomplish together as americans when we are realistic about those challenges. that is the thing i think about the word "crisis" in this country. >> mayor castro is not the first to suggest that. for 10 years now, we heard that the government is not asking all of us to do enough. >> it is interesting. the word "sacrifice," when i hear a politician say that, it usually means grab your wallet. it usually means increasing taxes. and i will give president obama credit to in his the first presidential candidate since walter mondale to run explicitly on a platform that he will raise taxes. >> he is saying he will raise taxes on the wealthy. >> according to the supreme court, he already has raised taxes. that was the basis on which the supreme court of held obamacare, that it was a ta
. that's important. because that distinguishes him from the united states senate which also has a legal obligation to submit a budget and has refused to do so for the last three years. you wonder why it is we can't come together on funding priorities, madam speaker, three years the senate has said we are not going to tell you what we are interested in doing. we are not going to provide you with any ideas. and because we won't move it, the house product can't move, the president doesn't have anything to work with, and you see the kind of economic turmoil that we are in today. but the president to his credit has submitted a budget each and every year with his priorities. this is the budget he submitted for 2012. this was just last february, the law required it. he complied with it. but he's running for re-election and he's got his fingers on the pulse of the american people, but what they need and what they desire and what they want from the united states government, all tuned towards an election in november anti-budget that he submitted -- and the budget that he submitted raidses taxes a
'm a forecaster, but we, you know, the united states is in this sort of very different position. you might argue japan, somewhat different circumstances, very high domestic savings rate, managed to sort of face a different set of constraints in that environment, but i ultimately agree with vince that, like, you have to deal with this problem, and you can't get around it. but we're operating under somewhat different constraints. >> john? >> yeah. which is everything's fine until it's not fine. but -- >> i didn't say not -- [laughter] >> the point is this time is different. [laughter] >> anyway, of course -- >> don't want to go there, vince? >> with yeah. >> all this precluding vince and ken's study was music to the ears of the folks at the imf who have had this view for some time that this is how these situations have to be, have to be dealt with. but certainly lew is right, everything doesn't have to get fixed today, but it's got to get fixed, and it's been the key, and the key is that it has to be that people have to have confidence that it will be fixed, and that's the tricky part; namely, how
the state of the economy than any other government reports we're getting. ashley: united states is one of the world's most economically free countries. think again. the cato institute says the u.s. dropped from the top 10 to 18th on the list in its annual report. coauthor ian vasquez will be our special guest ahead to explain that. 18th in economic --. tracy: we were 10th last year. he has got to tell us what is going on. time for stocks as we do every 15 minutes. we head down to nicole petallides on the floor of the new york stock exchange. nicole we're down about eight points right now? >> right. the truth is yesterday we gave back about 40 points. wee had two weeks in a row about gains. fed stimulus and bond buying extending low rates. everyone seems to be taking a bit of a breather. right now the dow is down as are s&p and nasdaq as well, all to the downside. down .1 or .2 of a percent. we have winners like apple which obviously broke new records. fedex has come under pressure. fedex once again is warning about a tough global economy. so they came out with their numbers today. they
was the biggest terrorist incident before 9/11 that the united states history had. a man who had been on my secret service detail had transferred there because he thought it would be a great place to raise his children. he was killed that day. along with other people. i had, like every politician, on occasion, gotten upset. and referred to government bureaucrats. i promised myself i would never use those two words together for the rest of my life. i would treat those people who serve our country with respect whether they are in uniform, law enforcement, fire fighters, and the other thing. [applause] that is it. if you are working for the future, i think the president's plan is better. i know the economic plan is better. and i know it will not amount to a hill of beans if you do not register and vote and get your friends to. so do it. god bless you all. [cheers and applause] ♪ >> have you visited the c-span campaign 2012 website? it can watch events from the campaign trail. you can also read what the candidates are saying on major issues like the economy, the deficit, national security, and immig
. the president may or may not be the next president of the united states. two thirds of the senate is not even up for the election. it is not as if this is a body not broadly reflective of the american sentiment. host:tom cole has a seat at the appropriations committee and also at the budget committee. he is here to take your questions or comments on congress and the federal budget and the debt and all the politics wrap up in that. let me ask you about medicare and social security. if there are changes in discretionary spending, everybody says that is not where the big problems are. guest: on medicare and medicaid, republicans have a plan that they have passed it twice. it has done over 42 votes. that is the paul ryan budget. you may like or dislike the plan, the problem has been we have not done a plan from the democratic senate. the administration has not presented a plan. if you are running for president, you ought to put a plan on the table and let's debate it. i argued that we should present a social security plan as well. then chairman paul ryan decided not to because he thought it was the
of the united states. it is a job that brings with it a lot of speaking responsibilities and oh, my god, could you see that tonight. first lady tonight, a long, personal, emotionally, frankly excellent speech from michelle obama. chris matthews? >> certainly made the connection, don't you think? i mean, so much of tonight was interactive. it was between her and that audience in the room. i thought the camera work was so important watching this on television. you saw on the faces of men and women, black and white, all different backgrounds, the connection. she was with people. the emotional connection, telling the story of her love affair with her husband. with her life of getting ahead. but there was one big difference than four years ago which just came through in the earlier speeches tonight. it was hope and change, yes, hope and change but not hope and change imaginally overnight. but hope through work and patience and time and effort and then change. i think it was a much more mature look at their own lives as they got there. i'll tell you, i assume most americans watching tonight who have
powers in his final address at the u.n. the united states and israel have pledged to do what they must to prevent tehran from deeflg nuclear weapon. >> translator: continued threats by the uncivilized zionist to resort to military action against our great nation is a clear example of this reality. >> reporter: u.s. and israeli leaders chose not to attend president mahmoud ahmadinejad's speech here in the u.n. in part because it occurred on yom kippur. demonstrators protested mahmoud ahmadinejad's appearance. >> mahmoud ahmadinejad, again does not represent us all. >> reporter: iranian-americans from across the country joined the protest. >> to send a message that the people of iran stand for democracy, human rights, secular nonnuclear iran. >> reporter: during his speech mahmoud ahmadinejad didn't address his country's nuclear program but did say his nation was committed to peace. >>> secretary of state hillary clinton said the work was al qaeda operatives on the cult in benghazi. at a u.n. conference yesterday clinton said al qaeda was exploiting the safety of northern africa to expan
conservative governor in the united states. florida, i understand it's a swinstate in presidential election, but it's a swing state when you have,ou know guys running like mitt romney and john mccain and bob dole. a tough conservative wins florida. >> what was the impact of that ad -- i couldn't believe when he picked ryan, the democrats ran an ad of some guy whoooke yaus granny off the edge of a cliff in a wheelchair. it was subtle. >> it was subtle but that doesn't work because marco rubio got elected by promising. the one big date that he had with charlie cristndhe deatppt, talked about raising social security to 70. bob graham, one of the most popular democratic politicians in florida history, always talked about the need of possly raising the retirement age for social security and medicare. therhe are a lot smarter than politicians think. so no, it wasn't that good. let's talk some more about ike because, again, i think the guy is slowly evolving into my favorite president. talk abo- you say he's a war hero whoated war. and i guess ike, after korea, u.s. serviceman wasn't killed? >> ye
a bipartisan consensus in the united states for many years that the u.s. and israel are the closest of allies, that we have to tackle problems in the middle east together. it's why you see legislation passing the united states senate 99-0 when it comes to confronting iran's nuclear ambitions and supporting -- supporting our closest ally israel, so it's a very strange position for him. it's really out of -- really out of sync with a broad bipartisan consensus in this country. >> jeb, let me go to you. i want to go back to libya and benghazi and that whole story. front page "new york times." we lost most of our intelligence assets because of this snafu, because of this mistake. the cia lost a lot of intelligence assets. we may be wiped out. now, again, president obama in the "60 minutes" last night could not get himself to say that this was premeditated, that this was a terrorist plot. he's still hanging on to the video story which, as you know, is a falsehood. i call it a lie. i believe ambassador, u.n. ambassador susan rice, should have been made to resign, or she should have taken the honora
of the united states. >> michael lewis, we will be back with you, talk a little bit of sports, a little bit of stephen strasburg and more throughout the hour. meantime, sue? >> indeed, ty. the markets gaining little bit of strength, up 85 points but also a bond auction in chicago. three years just went off the block. rick santelli at the cme. i saw a bid to cover of about 3.94%, which seems pretty much on the strong side to me but what do you think, ricky? >> yeah it was on the strong side. i almost had the big one when i read that number. i have a 20-year -- >> don't do that. >> i have a 20-year database of three-year note and i cannot find a higher bid to cover than today's 3.94. close to $4, chasing every dollar's worth of securities available for sale, just a big wow on that the wi market was flipping between 34 and 33 1/2, offered at 34 and a half, 34 the yield came in .337, a couple of three-tenths under 34 you could argue there was a little bit of a tail there, but even having said that, 36.8 better than the ten auction average on indirect. direct, 13.4, better than the ten auction a
threats from the united states. >>> back here at home, a new mosque will be built in santa clara county. county approval has been given to build the cordova center. the approval process has been controversial. look at this. although many support it, others say the plan to build a cemetery at that site could contaminate ground water. county supervisors say the center has passed every requirement. >>> beginning march 1st, rvs will be banned from parking overnight in parts of san francisco. yesterday, the board of supervisors passed the ban on the vehicles, saying it was to help people get out of rvs and into temporary housing. but homeless advocates say this could force more people onto the streets. a complete list approved will be banned by the tsa and will likely include parts of the sunset and bayview district. >>> tesla's score says he's working on a -- tesla's ceo says he's working on a rail, a people-moving tube that he calls a hyperloop. he says it would cost $6 billion and tickets bo -- tickets would be cheaper than airfare. >>> time now, 7:05. sal is gonna take us to a ride at th
in the 1970's and the united states the government spends and regulated too much. when the economy slow down, the federal reserve at the time lower interest rates and tried to choose the economy. what we ended up with was inflation and slow growth. the fed cannot create jobs. all it can do is create money. eventually if you create too much money you create inflation, and that will harm the economy in long run. i sure hope we don't have qe for. cheryl: you can believe that they're going to bring up inflation if it rears its ugly head commanded by peace center. thank you very much. good to talk to you always. >> thanks. cheryl: we want to know what all of you think. here's a question. the best way to reduce the deficit? higher taxes, spending cuts, or both? log onto gerriwillis.com and on the right hand side of the screen. ellis said the results of the end of tonight's show. meanwhile, that same survey of business economists shows that obamacare will not bring down costs. fat, they say it will severely hurt the economy in the long run. elizabeth macdonald here with the story. cheryl: a very im
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